Rules and Format

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Universally Accepted Rules and Format.
The 1-vs-1 tournaments, or Duels, are most indicative of individual martial skill. These are scored in a
way somewhat similar to other combat sports. The fighter with the highest point score when the time limit is up, wins. However, unlike Sport Fencing, the fighters do not stop each time a point is scored – hence the need for four martials to ensure that proper score is kept throughout the bout. Bouts are decided on a best of two or three rounds basis. It is possible for a round to result in a draw. In this case further rounds are fought until one combatant has the winning advantage of two rounds. The separate weapons disciplines in the 1-vs-1 category are Sword and Shield, Longsword and Pole-arm. Sometimes a triathlon event will also be incorporated into the 1-vs-1 duel format – Sword and Shield, Longsword and Sword and Buckler.

rules

Besides the 1-vs-1, we have the Buhurt, or team melee. In these Buhurt events, the bouts are usually fought by teams in mixed weapon disciplines of 3-vs-3, 5-vs-5 and 16-vs-16. Success in Buhurt comes down to teamwork, strategy and communication as well as individual skill contributing to the success of your team. The rules for Buhurt are different to those from 1-vs-1 competition where the end goal is not to gain the highest score possible before the time limit is reached, but to physically knock as many of the opposing team down to the ground. An opponent is out of the fight and considered “dead” once they have three points of contact with the ground. Once down, they remain down and in place until the end of the round. The round is finished when all of the opposing team have been floored or one team has 3 or more fighters left, and the opposing team has only 1. Bouts are decided on a best of two or three rounds basis. It is possible for a round to result in a draw. In this case further rounds are fought until one team has the winning advantage of two rounds.

Importance of Historical Accuracy and Safety.
Historical accuracy of our medieval armour, up to 35kg in weight, is important not just from a visual aspect but from a safety aspect as well. Historical accuracy of our medieval soft kit – civilian clothing and padding underneath the armour – is also a very important factor that is highly stressed on a national as well as international level.  To ensure the safety of competitors, all types and shapes of weapons are vetted before a match begins to ensure that safety standards are strictly adhered to.